PipeWire and fixing the Linux

PipeWire has already made great strides forward in terms of improving the audio handling situation on Linux, but one of the original goals was to also bring along the video side of the house. 

In fact in the first few releases of Fedora Workstation where we shipped PipeWire we solely enabled it as a tool to handle screen sharing for Wayland and Flatpaks. So with PipeWire having stabilized a lot for audio now we feel the time has come to go back to the video side of PipeWire and work to improve the state-of-art for video capture handling under Linux.

Wim Taymans did a presentation to our team inside Red Hat on the 30th of September talking about the current state of the world and where we need to go to move forward. I thought the information and ideas in his presentation deserved wider distribution so this blog post is building on that presentation to share it more widely and also hopefully rally the community to support us in this endeavour.

The current state of video capture, usually webcams, handling on Linux is basically the v4l2 kernel API. It has served us well for a lot of years, but we believe that just like you don’t write audio applications directly to the ALSA API anymore, you should neither write video applications directly to the v4l2 kernel API anymore. With PipeWire we can offer a lot more flexibility, security and power for video handling, just like it does for audio.

The v4l2 API is an open/ioctl/mmap/read/write/close based API, meant for a single application to access at a time. There is a library called libv4l2, but nobody uses it because it causes more problems than it solves (no mmap, slow conversions, quirks). But there is no need to rely on the kernel API anymore as there are GStreamer and PipeWire plugins for v4l2 allowing you to access it using the GStreamer or PipeWire API instead. So our goal is not to replace v4l2, just as it is not our goal to replace ALSA, v4l2 and ALSA are still the kernel driver layer for video and audio.

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PipeWire is a server for handling audio and video streams and hardware on Linux.